Adabiyotlar 622452 ta
Videodars 982 ta
Audiokitob 2205 ta

 

Friday, 12 November 2021 05:53

Urban Legends

Written by
Rate this item
(0 votes)

Urban legends are popular stories alleged to be true and transmitted from person to person by oral or written communication.People didn't begin talking about "urban legendsuntil the 1930s and 1940sbut they have existed in some form for thousands of yearsUrban legends are simply the modern version of traditional folklorelegends and mythsIn most cultures of the worldthey have always existed alongsideor in place ofrecorded historyWhere history is obsessed with accurately writing down the details of eventstraditional folklore and legends are characterized by the "oral tradition," the passing of stories by word of mouth.

In old Europethe deep forests was a mysterious place to peopleand there were indeed creatures that might attack you there (the crone Baba Yaga in the ancient slavic folklorfor instance). We do have a lot of fears in common with our ancestorsof courseAs is clear in "Snow White and the Seven Dwarves," the fear of food contamination has been around for quite a while.

Typicallyurban legends are characterized by some combination of humorhorrorwarningembarrassmentmorality or appeal to empathyWe hear stories and rumours about killers and madmen on the looseunsafe manufactured productsshocking or funny personal experiences and many other unexplained mysteries of daily lifeSometimes we encounter different oral versions of such storiesand on occasion we may read about similar events in newspapers or magazinesbut seldom do we findor even seek afterreliable documentationRememberurban legends aren't defined as false storiesthey're defined as stories alleged to be true in the absence of real evidence or proofThe lack of verification in no way diminished the appeal urban legends have for usWe enjoy them merely as storiesand we tend at least to half-believe them as possibly accurate reports.

It might seem unlikely that legends - urban legends at that - would continue to be created in an age of widespread literacyrapid mass communications and information technologyIn factinformation technology actually accelerates the spread of tall talesIn the past 10 yearsthere has been a huge surge of urban legends on the InternetThe most common venue is forwarded e-mailThis storytelling method is unique because usually the story is not re-interpreted by each person who passes it onA person simply clicks the "Forwardicon in their e-mailand types in all his friend's e-mail addressesHaving the original story gives e-mail legends a feeling of legitimacyYou don't know the original authorbut they are speaking directly to you.

The most remarkable thing about urban legends is that so many people believe them and pass them onOn the Internet and in universities all over the worldyou'll find a lot of people interested in the role of urban legends in modern societyMany folklorists argue that more the more gruesome legends embody basic human fearsproviding a cautionary note or moral lesson telling us how to protect ourselves from dangerIt does seem to be the case that we have a built-in tendency to interpret life in narrative termsin spite of how rarely events in the real world unfold in a story-like fashionMaybe it's a psychological survival tacticConsider some of the horrifyingabsurdincomprehensible realities we must reckon with during our short sojourns as mortal human beingsPerhaps one of the ways we cope is by turning the things that scare usembarrass usfill us with longing and make us laugh into tall talesWe're charmed by them for the same reasons we're charmed by Hollywood moviesgood guys winbad guys get their comeuppanceeverything is larger than life and never a loose end is left dangling.

By definitionurban legends seem to have a life of their owncreeping through a society one person at a timeAnd like a real life formthey adapt to changing conditionsIt will always be human nature to tell bizarre storiesand there will always be an audience waiting to believe themThe urban legend is part of our make-up.

Read 641 times